Posted by on Sep 13, 2017 in |

8.50

This is the second year we bought this coffee and we’ll use this mainly for our house espresso; Blackjack. It’s smooth and balanced profile with spice notes rather than a strong acidic fruity character makes it a welcomed espresso option during the Winter period. Think of notes like orange/apple blossom and almonds or marzipan.

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Description

Karambi is one of the stations we keep on returning to year after year. Its smooth and balanced profile with spice notes rather than a strong acidic fruity character makes it a welcomed espresso option during the Winter period.

Karambi washing station

Karambi is located in the sector with the same name in the Nyamasheke district, Western province. The altitude in the region starts at 1700 and goes up to 2000m. The Nyamasheke district has the highest concentration of washing station in the entire country. The region lies along the Kivu Lake. Growing conditions are optimal here with good altitude, great soil, favourable rainfall – basically everything to produce the best coffees. Which obviously explains the high number of washing stations here!

When producers deliver their cherry, the washing station staff selects the best cherries and removes any underripe cherries through flotation. They have sorting tables and a trained staff only for this purpose. Given the high number of washing stations, the stations face high competition to receive cherry from the surrounding community. Therefore, they have to accept almost every delivery to prevent the producer to sell elsewhere with less hassle. Hence, an important selection task has to be carried out by the washing station staff in order to produce the best coffees.

Post-harvest

The washed process follows the classic method for processing. The cherries pass through the depulper and mucilage removal machine. With part of the mucilage still intact, the coffee undergoes a 12 to 24-hour fermentation in concrete tanks to break down the fruit. Fermentation time depends on the weather conditions. Afterwards, the coffee passes through the washing and grading channel. The densest beans remain at the start of the channel. The beans with least density float to the end of the line. This process separates the batch in 5 different parchment grades. Only the heaviest beans are selected for the microlot production.